CKLG Top 30 Mar. 28, 1975

CKLG Top 30 - Mar. 28 1975 CKLG Top 30 - Mar. 28 1975 CKLG Top 30 - Mar. 28 1975 CKLG Top 30 - Mar. 28 1975

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March 28, 1975 — Hi-Lites:

  1. My Eyes Adored You — Frankie Valli
  2. No No Song — Ringo Starr
  3. Have You Never Been Mellow — Olivia Newton-John
  4. Lady Marmalade — Labelle
  5. Philadelphia Freedom — Elton John
  6. Roll On Down The Highway — Bachman-Turner Overdrive
  7. Don't Call Us/We'll Call You — Sugarloaf
  8. Black Water — Doobie Brothers
  9. You Are So Beautiful — Joe Cocker
  10. Get Dancin' — Disco Tex & The Sex-O-Lettes

CKLG AM Vancouver — Top Thirty Singles for Saturday March 28, 1974.

Are You Valid? Are You Void?

Well, this certainly ranks up there as one of the frikkin’ weirdest music videos I’ve ever seen… Remember watching this on the old "Nite Dreems" show back in the day.

Artist: Shrink 
Song: "Valid or Void" 
Year: circa 1979 

Been hunting around for this one for a couple of years now, and finally it has surfaced! YouTube – gotta love it!

PS: Thanks to Avex Design for their Responsive Youtube Embed Tutorial!

Bad 70s Technology (part 1)

Doomed to the scrap heap of obsolescence, the eight-track cartridge easily falls into the category of "It seemed like a good idea at the time…" Of our fairly substantial eight-track library, which at one time included such timeless classics as KISS ALIVE! and the first BOSTON album, only three tapes survive. From Wikipedia: "… some of the inherent deficiencies of the Stereo 8 format that contributed to its decline:

Led Zeppelin IV eight-track

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  • High wow and flutter due to the constantly changing load presented by the sliding tape pack
  • Tendency to jam as the tape got dirty, the lubricant wore away, and the tape was exposed to heat
  • Flattening of the pinch roller, over time, when a cartridge was left plugged in, causing increased wow and flutter
  • Inability to attain and maintain head alignment due to the movable head design.

"By the late 1970s, when sales of eight-tracks slipped, (record companies) were quick to abandon the format…"

There were, of course, other factors that contributed to the demise of the eight-track — not the least of which was the fact that record companies often had to resort to outright butchery in order to fit an entire album on a tape: note that "Rock and Roll" on the Zeppelin eight-track has been split into two parts — it just fades out in the middle of the song, then clicks over to part two. As if no one would notice!